160 articles from TUESDAY 5.10.2021

New way to image whole organisms in 3D brings key skin color pigment into focus

To understand the biological underpinnings of skin and hair pigmentation and related diseases such as albinism or melanoma, scientists and doctors need quantitative, three-dimensional information about the architecture, content and location of pigment cells. Researchers have developed a new technique that allows scientists to visualize every cell containing melanin pigment in 3D, in whole...

Increase in fatal opioid overdoses after hospital discharge

The period after hospital discharge is a high-risk time for people who use illicit opioids such as heroin, according to new research. Fatal opioid overdoses are four times more likely in the first two days after hospital discharge than at other times, and people who use illicit drugs need extra support when being discharged from hospital.

One in three kids with food allergies say they’ve been bullied because of their condition

Living with a food allergy can greatly impact a child's everyday life -- from limiting participation in social activities to being treated differently by peers. While previous research indicates many kids experience food allergy-related bullying, a new study found that offering kids with food allergies a multi-question assessment gives a more accurate picture of the size and scope of the problem.

Weed goes off script to resist herbicides

Cementing waterhemp's reputation as a hard-to-kill weed in corn and soybean production systems, researchers have now documented the weed deviating from standard detoxification strategies to resist an herbicide that has never been commercialized.

Men Are Now More Likely to Be Single Than Women. It’s Not a Good Sign

Almost a third of adult single men live with a parent. Single men are much more likely to be unemployed, financially fragile and to lack a college degree than those with a partner. They’re also likely to have lower median earnings; single men earned less in 2019 than in 1990, even adjusting for inflation. Single women, meanwhile, earn the same as they did 30 years ago, but those with...

Process leading to supernova explosions and cosmic radio bursts unearthed at PPPL

A promising method for producing and observing on Earth a process important to black holes, supernova explosions and other extreme cosmic events has been proposed by scientists at Princeton University's Department of Astrophysical Sciences, SLAC National Acceleraor Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The process, called quantum...

Improving the evidence: Scientists review quantitative climate migration literature

Quantitative empirical studies exploring how climatic and other environmental drivers influence migration are increasing year by year. PIK scientists have now reviewed methodological approaches used in the quantitative climate migration literature. Their review plays an important role when it comes to assessing how climatic factors influence human migration, and provides guidance to researchers...

The Facebook whistleblower says its algorithms are dangerous. Here’s why.

On Sunday night, the primary source for the Wall Street Journal’s Facebook Files, an investigative series based on internal Facebook documents, revealed her identity in an episode of 60 Minutes. Frances Haugen, a former product manager at the company, says she came forward after she saw Facebook’s leadership repeatedly prioritize profit over safety. Before quitting…

How the expanded child tax credit is helping families

American households making less than $50,000 are more likely than higher-earning families to spend the expanded child tax credit on essential expenses and tutors for their children, found a survey from the Social Policy Institute (SPI) at Washington University in St. Louis.

Physicists report promising approach to harnessing exotic electronic behavior

For some 50 years scientists have worked to harness Bloch oscillations, an exotic kind of behavior by electrons that could introduce a new field of physics—and important new technologies—much like more conventional electronic behavior has led to everything from smart watches to computers powerful enough to get us to the Moon.

Waterhemp goes off script to resist herbicides

Cementing waterhemp's reputation as a hard-to-kill weed in corn and soybean production systems, University of Illinois researchers have now documented the weed deviating from standard detoxification strategies to resist an herbicide that has never been commercialized.

Climate Pressure Mounts for Biden As a Major Conference Looms

A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. Anyone who has followed U.S. climate policy is familiar with the cycle of bold attempts to enact climate rules that eventually sputter, followed by years of inaction. President Bill Clinton proposed an energy tax before backing away under...