130 articles from TUESDAY 23.11.2021

For a fungus, the right 'accessories' can make or break a relationship with a plant

Plants interact with a diversity of organisms over the course of their lifetime, but even very similar microbes can cause opposite reactions. Two strains of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) share a core genome, but one is a beneficial endophyte while the other is a detrimental pathogen causing wilt and death. A new study, published in the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journal, tried to...

Research sheds new light on effects of dietary restriction

In new research, Aric N. Rogers, Ph.D., who studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms of aging at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, has discovered that muscle may be a protected tissue under conditions of dietary restriction, or DR.

Researchers develop new approach to nanoparticles that stop internal bleeding

When a person experiences a trauma that leads to significant bleeding, the first few minutes are critical. It's important that they receive intravenous medication quickly to control the bleeding, but delivering the medication at the right rate can prove challenging. Slower infusions can cause fewer negative reactions, but the medication might not work fast enough, particularly in the case of a...

Ultrashort-pulse lasers kill bacterial superbugs, spores

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that multidrug-resistant bacteria and bacterial spores can be killed by ultrashort-pulse lasers. The findings could lead to new ways to sterilize wounds and blood products without damaging human cells.

How moles change into melanoma

Melanoma researchers published a study that gives a new explanation of what causes moles to change into melanoma. These findings pave the way for more research into how to reduce the risk of melanoma, delay development, and detect melanoma early.

Microbes can provide sustainable hydrocarbons for the petrochemical industry

The petrochemical industry turns oil and gas into precursors used to synthesize lubricants and other critical products. Chemists show that bacteria can be metabolically engineered to generate similar precursors, providing a sustainable replacement for fossil fuels and using less energy. The microbes need only glucose. The medium-chain hydrocarbons they produce can be broken down into shorter...

Astronomers discover more than 300 possible new exoplanets

UCLA astronomers have identified 366 new exoplanets, thanks in large part to an algorithm developed by a UCLA postdoctoral scholar. Among their most noteworthy findings is a planetary system that comprises a star and at least two gas giant planets, each roughly the size of Saturn and located unusually close to one another.

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images Saturn

From a viewpoint about 90 kilometers (56 miles) above Lacus Veris, "Lake of Spring," the camera aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft imaged Saturn on October 13, 2021. In this view, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) was looking down at the north face of the rings, and from this perspective the rings in front of Saturn appear below its equator.

Massive study reveals editorial bias and nepotism in biomedical journals

Scientific journals are expected to consider research manuscripts dispassionately and without favor. But in a study publishing on November 23rd in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Alexandre Scanff, Florian Naudet and Clara Locher from the University of Rennes, and colleagues, reveal that a subset of journals may be exercising considerable bias and favoritism.