123 articles from TUESDAY 11.1.2022

Faculty mentor training program strengthens university's institutional climate

Many universities are in search of strategies to improve their faculty diversity and institutional climate. One factor known to be critical for faculty satisfaction is proper mentorship, but many faculty, particularly women and those from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds, lack clear access to high quality mentoring. To address this, the Office of Faculty Affairs at University of...

Medicare Will Not Fully Cover Aduhelm, the Controversial—and Costly—Alzheimer’s Disease Drug

Medicare said Tuesday it will limit coverage of a $28,000-a-year Alzheimer’s drug whose benefits have been widely questioned, a major development in the nation’s tug-of-war over the fair value of new medicines that offer tantalizing possibilities but come with prohibitive prices. The initial determination from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services means that patients taking...

New treasure trove of globular clusters holds clues about galaxy evolution

A survey completed using a combination of ground and space-based telescopes yielded a treasure trove of previously unknown globular clusters—old, dense groups of thousands of stars that all formed at the same time—in the outer regions of the elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. The work presents a significant advance in understanding the architecture and cosmological history of this galaxy and...

A new approach to enterprise risk management

While some organizations can respond to unexpected events, which can span from disruptive technologies and intensified competition to extreme weather events and climate related disasters, most of them cannot, and have a challenging time. So, how do we deal effectively with an increasingly complex and uncertain world?

Understanding how autoactivation triggers cell death

Apoptosis is a process that causes cell death. It can go awry in cancer cells, sustaining the disease. Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have captured the structure of BAK, a protein that triggers apoptosis. They have shown how BAK autoactivates, essentially turning itself on. Understanding how apoptosis is triggered can lead to drugs that kill cancer cells. The findings were...

Semiconductor demonstrates elusive quantum physics model

With a little twist and the turn of a voltage knob, Cornell researchers have shown that a single material system can toggle between two of the wildest states in condensed matter physics: The quantum anomalous Hall insulator and the two-dimensional topological insulator.

Safe drinking water remains out of reach for many Californians

An estimated 370,000 Californians rely on drinking water that may contain high levels of arsenic, nitrate or hexavalent chromium, and contaminated drinking water disproportionately impact communities of color in the state, finds a new analysis. Because this study is limited to three common contaminants, results likely underestimate the actual number of Californians impacted by unsafe drinking...

Mechanism controlling tertiary lymphoid structure formation in tumors discovered

Tertiary lymphoid structures are formations that occur outside of the lymphatic system. They contain immune cells and are similar in structure and function to lymph nodes and other lymphoid structures. However, little is known about how tertiary lymphoid structures form. In a new article published in Immunity, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that...

How much do students learn when they double the speed of their class videos?

A new study shows that students retain information quite well when watching lectures at up to twice their actual speed. With 85% of college students surveyed as part of the study reporting they "speed-watched" lecture videos, the researchers engaged students in a series of experiments to test how faster speeds affected learning. Recorded lectures have become a routine part of course instruction...

Study finds that K-12 experience and population density are among factors that support rural 'brain gain'

Many academics and journalists have written about rural "brain drain," the migration of talented and bright young people who leave their communities, usually in search of better economic opportunities. But a team of Iowa State University researchers have identified three significant factors that draw people back to their hometowns a decade or two after leaving: public schools, population density...