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36,426 articles from Guardian Unlimited Science

Bionic robo-fish able to remove microplastics from seas revealed by scientists – video

Scientists have designed a tiny robot fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them. Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from bigger plastic things used every day. They are one of the 21st century’s biggest environmental problems because once they are dispersed into the environment they are...

Female scientists less likely to be given authorship credits, analysis finds

Disparities extend to lower chance of being named on patents and to areas such as healthcare where women dominateFemale scientists are less likely to receive authorship credit or to be named on patents related to the work they do compared with their male counterparts – including in fields such as healthcare, where women dominate – data suggests.This gender gap may help to explain...

Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seas

Tiny self-propelled robo-fish can swim around, latch on to free-floating microplastics and fix itself if it gets damagedScientists have designed a tiny robot-fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them on its soft, flexible, self-healing body.Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from the bigger...

Bi by Julia Shaw review – the past and present of a maligned minority

A tour of the science, culture and history of bisexuality that ranges from the vehemently political to the charmingly weirdAccording to periodic reports in the media, bisexuality has been a brand-new fad since at least the 1890s. It was all the rage in 1974, for example, when the US magazine Newsweek discovered “Bisexual Chic: Anyone Goes”. A generation later, in 1995, the same magazine...

Half in UK back genome editing to prevent severe diseases

Survey also finds younger generations far more in favour of designer babies than older people areMore than half the UK backs the idea of rewriting the DNA of human embryos to prevent severe or life-threatening diseases, according to a survey.Commissioned by the Progress Educational Trust (PET), a fertility and genomics charity, the Ipsos poll found that 53% of people support the use of human...

Terrawatch: saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing

Study may have solved paradox of the faint young Sun – which shone 20% less bright in Archean timesThe Sun shone 20% less brightly on early Earth, and yet fossil evidence shows that our planet had warm shallow seas where stromatolites – microbial mats – thrived. Now a study may have solved the “faint young Sun paradox”, showing that saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing...

Wrist-worn trackers can detect Covid before symptoms, study finds

Sensor tech can alert wearer to Covid early, helping to prevent onward transmissionHealth trackers worn on the wrist could be used to spot Covid-19 days before any symptoms appear, according to researchers.Growing numbers of people worldwide use the devices to monitor changes in skin temperature, heart and breathing rates. Now a new study shows that this data could be combined with artificial...


TUESDAY 21. JUNE 2022


UK flight schools hire instructors for electric aircraft as fuel prices bite

Pilot schools are recruiting instructors to meet demand for more sustainable and cheaper trainingPilot training schools in the UK are actively looking for instructors who can teach on electric-powered aeroplanes, as the surging price of fuel gives a boost to the country’s emerging zero-emissions market.The global electric aviation industry remains in its infancy, with the Slovenian-made...

UK scientists urge higher uptake of Covid boosters among elderly

Fifth of people over 75 in England have not had fourth vaccine, raising concern as case rate rises againAround a fifth of people aged 75 and over in England have yet to have a fourth Covid jab, data suggests, leading to calls for a renewed push for vaccination of the vulnerable amid rising infections and hospitalisations.According to figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), in the...

If we want to fight cancer, we should tax the companies that cause it | Jon Whelan and Alexandra Zissu

We tax cigarettes and sodas because they’re bad for you. We should tax companies that put carcinogens in the environment​​Americans don’t agree on much of anything lately. Except taxes – who doesn’t hate taxes? And also cancer: everyone hates cancer.Maybe hating cancer was on President Joe Biden’s mind when, earlier this month, he shared plans to reduce the cancer death rate by at...

When stressed, we ‘catastrophize’ – but we can learn to calm our irrational fears | Sophie Brickman

Our primitive brains summon up worst-case scenarios to protect us from danger. In today’s world, that can be debilitatingThe first day I returned to work after maternity leave, I walked to the office racked with a fear I knew to be highly unlikely: that our new, and loving, caregiver would push the stroller across the street at the precise moment a reckless driver ran the light. I imagined the...

Life will find a way: could scientists make Jurassic Park a reality?

Just a few years from now, herds of woolly ‘mammoths’ could be roaming the Siberian tundra. Are dodos and dinosaurs next for de-extinction?What Alida Bailleul saw through the microscope made no sense. She was examining thin sections of fossilised skull from a young hadrosaur, a duck-billed, plant-eating beast that roamed what is now Montana 75m years ago, when she spotted features that made...

Seagrass meadows: can we rewild one of the world’s best carbon sinks? – podcast

They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world’s most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project in Hampshire. She speaks to marine biologist Tim...

Balancing on one leg may be useful health test in later life, research suggests

People who cannot stand on one leg for 10 seconds are found to be almost twice as likely to die within 10 yearsIf you have difficulty standing on one leg, it could be a sign of something more serious than overdoing it at the office summer drinks party. Middle-aged and elderly people who cannot balance on one leg for 10 seconds are almost twice as likely to die within 10 years than those who can,...


MONDAY 20. JUNE 2022


Truthful climate reporting shifts viewpoints, but only briefly, study finds

Ohio State University researchers gauged responses to climate science versus scepticism and suggest facts bear repeatingPeople’s views of the climate crisis can be influenced by the media, according to new research. But accurate scientific reporting only has limited impact on people who already have a fixed political viewpoint, particularly if that is opposed to climate action.Scientists ran an...

Monday briefing: What ‘living with Covid’ might look like

In today’s newsletter: With case numbers on the rise in the UK, Nimo Omer looks at what shape our future relationship with the virus could takeSign up here for our new daily newsletter, First EditionGood morning. At this point, most of us – 7 in 10 in the UK – have had Covid-19. Many have had it multiple times. And there’s a reason everyone seems to be catching it again in the UK: since...

Starwatch: look to the east at dawn for a sight of gibbous moon

On successive days, before the sun rises, the visible planets will be visited in turn by the waning moonAwake with the dawn chorus this week? Take a look to the east. On successive days, before the sun rises, the visible planets will be visited in turn by the waning gibbous moon.Start looking at about 0400BST on the morning of 21 June, when the moon will be close to Jupiter. The chart shows the...

Only a tiny minority of rural Britons are farmers – so why do they hold such sway? | George Monbiot

The government pretends that farming and the countryside are synonymous – and our environment suffers as a resultWe have a problem. The environment secretary, George Eustice – the highest green authority in the land – is, in a crucial respect, a climate denier. In an interview with the Telegraph, he claimed that “livestock, particularly if you do it with the right pastoral system, has a...

China carries out anti-missile tests amid opposition to US systems in South Korea

Beijing says test was not aimed aimed at any country, though it has objected to US THAAD system positioned in South KoreaChina carried out a test of “ground-based midcourse anti-missile intercept technology” that “achieved its expected purpose”, the defence ministry in Beijing has said, describing it as defensive and not aimed at any country.Beijing has tested missile interceptors before;...

Spirals of blue light in New Zealand night sky leave stargazers ‘kind of freaking out’

Social media abuzz with pictures and theories about formations thought to be from exhaust plume of SpaceX rocketNew Zealand stargazers were left puzzled and awed by strange, spiralling light formations in the night sky on Sunday night.Around 7.25pm Alasdair Burns, a stargazing guide on Stewart Island/Rakiura, received a text from a friend: go outside and look at the sky. “As soon as we actually...


SUNDAY 19. JUNE 2022


Queen of the corvids: the scientist fighting to save the world’s brainiest birds

A pioneering research laboratory in Cambridge proves that corvids are delightfully clever. Here, its founder reveals what the crow family has taught her – and her heartbreak at the centre’s closureLeo, an 18-year-old rook, is playing mind games. It’s a street-corner classic – cups and balls. Only this time the venue is the Comparative Cognition Laboratory in Madingley, Cambridge, and the...

Five years ago I felt like a failure as a dad, now I’m sharing with other men how to love their children

After admitting to other Black dads he found parenting difficult, Marvyn Harrison began transforming his relationship with his kidsIt was on Father’s Day, five years ago, that Marvyn Harrison sent a heartfelt message to his friends that would change his life for ever. Back then, his son was three and his daughter was six months old. And he couldn’t seem to help feeling constantly like a fake,...

‘It’s taken so long’: Monkeypox patients raise concerns over UK tracing delays

Two men who contracted the virus share their experiences of contact tracing and vaccination systemUK monkeypox outbreak not yet under control, say expertsWith the monkeypox outbreak ongoing in the UK, some of those affected have raised concerns over delays and difficulties in contact tracing and vaccination.Joel* told the Guardian he sought advice on testing and vaccination after becoming aware a...