feed info

228,374 articles from PhysOrg

The dark matter of the universe has a long lifetime

New research from the Niels Bohr Institute presents new information that adds another piece of knowledge to the jigsaw puzzle of the dark mystery of the universe - dark matter. The research has just been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

US Beef Supply Safe, Agriculture Says

(AP) -- The nation's meat supply is "the safest in the world," a U.S. agriculture official said Monday, seeking to reassure consumers following the recall of 21.7 million pounds of ground beef that may be contaminated with E. coli bacteria.

Facebook Warned in N.Y. on Safety Claims

(AP) -- The social networking Web site Facebook has been warned that it could face a consumer fraud charge for failing to live up to claims that youngsters there are safer from sexual predators than at most sites and that it promptly responds to concerns, a spokesman for New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said Sunday.

Great Plains' historical stability vulnerable to future changes

A survey of long-term trends in population, farm income, and crop production in the agricultural Great Plains concludes that threats to society and the environment are counterbalanced by “surprising stability” and the potential for short- and medium-term sustainability.

Initial reaction to nicotine can dictate addiction

Following up on studies that have indicated the speed with which adolescents can get hooked on cigarettes, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have conducted the first study to determine why some adolescents who try smoking get addicted while others do not.

Microsoft to Unveil Office Live Workspace

(AP) -- Microsoft Corp. is unveiling a Web component for its desktop-based Office programs that lets computer users store, share and comment on documents, but the software maker did not go so far as to let people create new files from scratch online.

Secrets of 1957 Sputnik Launch Revealed

(AP) -- When Sputnik took off 50 years ago, the world gazed at the heavens in awe and apprehension, watching what seemed like the unveiling of a sustained Soviet effort to conquer space and score a stunning Cold War triumph.

Residual fetal cells in women may provide protection against breast cancer

Fetal cells that persist in a woman`s body long after pregnancy - a common occurrence known in scientific circles as fetal microchimerism - in some cases may reduce the woman`s risk of breast cancer, according to researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The findings, published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer Research, add to the Jekyll and Hyde characteristics of fetal...

Venous origin of the mammalian lymphatic vasculature

In the October 1 issue of G&D, Dr. Guillermo Oliver (St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital) and colleagues present new evidence to resolve a century-old debate over the origin of the mammalian lymphatic vasculature. Understanding the development of the lymphatic vasculature is integral to understanding its function in both health (mediating immunity and maintaining tissue fluid levels) and disease...

Childhood TV viewing a risk for behavior problems

Daily television viewing for two or more hours in early childhood can lead to behavioral problems and poor social skills, according to a study of children 2.5 to 5.5 years of age conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


SUNDAY 30. SEPTEMBER 2007


3 Quakes Strike in Pacific Ocean

(AP) -- Three strong earthquakes struck Sunday near New Zealand and the U.S. territory of Guam in remote parts of the Pacific Ocean, monitoring agencies said.

Barry Diller's IAC Revamps IWon.com

(AP) -- IAC/InterActiveCorp, the Internet company controlled by media mogul Barry Diller, plans to relaunch its iWon.com Web site Monday with new games, more prizes and plans to add social networking functions.

Poor Smokers Would Pay for Health Bill

(AP) -- Congressional Democrats have chosen an unlikely source to pay for the bulk of their proposed $35 billion increase in children's health coverage: people with relatively little money and education.

Second pathway behind HIV-associated immune system dysfunction identified

Researchers at the Partners AIDS Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (PARC-MGH) may have discovered a second molecular “switch” responsible for turning off the immune system`s response against HIV. Last year members of the same team identified a molecule called PD-1 that suppresses the activity of HIV-specific CD8 T cells that should destroy virus-infected cells. Now the...

MicroRNAs may be key to HIV's ability to hide, evade drugs

Tiny pieces of genetic material called microRNA (miRNA), better known for its roles in cancer, could be a key to unlocking the secrets of how HIV, the AIDS virus, evades detection, hiding in the immune system. Researchers at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia have shown that when an individual infected with HIV receives a powerful cocktail of antiviral agents called HAART (highly active...