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242,771 articles from PhysOrg

New method extracts neutrons from superfluid helium

“There are many applications for ultracold neutrons in fundamental physics,” Oliver Zimmer tells PhysOrg.com. “And we will find even more applications with a stronger source of ultracold neutrons.” Zimmer, a scientist at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble, France, thinks that he and his colleagues may have found a way to tap a better source for ultracold neutrons by extracting them from...

Pleasant odors perceived the same by different cultures

Chinese, Africans and Indians may differ in what odors they find yummy, but they all perceive pleasantness in the same way, according to the findings of neurobiologists from the University of California, Berkeley, and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.

Recycling wind turbines

The development of wind power promises much in terms of providing us with renewable energy for the future and wind turbines could be the most effective way to harness that power. Danish researchers now suggest that in order to assess the overall environmental impact of wind power, however, the finite lifespan of wind turbines and the need to replace and recycle them must be taken into account....

Simulating kernel production influences maize model accuracy

Recently, researchers at Iowa State University discovered a way to increase the accuracy of a popular crop model. By zeroing in on early stages leading up to kernel formation, scientists believe they can help improve yield predictions across a variety of environmental conditions. The team of scientists reported their findings in the September-October issue of Crop Science.

Computer program traces ancestry using anonymous DNA samples

A group of computer scientists, mathematicians, and biologists from around the world have developed a computer algorithm that can help trace the genetic ancestry of thousands of individuals in minutes, without any prior knowledge of their background. The team`s findings will be published in the September 2007 edition of the journal PLoS Genetics.

Palm Struggles to Shine Again

(AP) -- Palm Inc.'s death knell has been rung over and over - on Wall Street, in headlines, and by a growing number of discontented fans.

Scientists discover technique to help 'friendly bacteria'

There is currently a great deal of interest in the health-associated properties of probiotics, also known as ‘beneficial` or ‘friendly` bacteria, and prebiotics, the food needed for the growth of probiotic when inside our bodies. University of Leicester scientists have discovered a natural fruit-based extract that dramatically improves the growth and probiotic qualities of ‘friendly` bacteria...

Suit Seeks 'A La Carte' Channel Choices

(AP) -- The U.S. pay-TV industry amounts to a cartel because it maintains profits by offering channels in prepackaged tiers rather than "a la carte," according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in Los Angeles.

Utah Officials Alarmed Over Bullfrogs

(AP) -- Utah wildlife officials are alarmed over the presence of American bullfrogs. Acting on a tip from a golfer, biologists confirmed the frogs were in a pond at Roosevelt Golf Course. They have moved elsewhere in the Uinta Basin in eastern Utah, 150 miles east of Salt Lake City.

Oracle 1Q Profit Up 25 Percent

(AP) -- Business software maker Oracle Corp. overcame the recent economic turbulence that raised recession anxieties to deliver a fiscal first-quarter performance that topped analyst expectations.

Scientists launch deep-sea scientific drilling program to study volatile earthquake zone

Today, the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) gets underway, with the Japanese drilling vessel Chikyu departing from Shingu Port with scientists aboard, all ready to log, drill, sample, and install monitoring instrumentation in one of the most active earthquake zones on Earth. The vessel's launch starts the first of a series of scientific drilling expeditions that will...

Mystery Boy in Iron Coffin Identified

(AP) -- Researchers have solved the mystery of the boy in the iron coffin. The cast-iron coffin was discovered by utility workers in Washington two years ago. Smithsonian scientists led by forensic anthropologist Doug Owsley set about trying to determine who was buried in it, so the body could be placed in a new, properly marked grave.

SEC Subpoenas Jobs in Stock Options Case

(AP) -- Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs has been subpoenaed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to give a deposition in a stock-options backdating case against Apple's former general counsel, a person familiar with the case told The Associated Press Thursday.


THURSDAY 20. SEPTEMBER 2007


Nasal surgery helps transsexuals

British scientists say transsexuals undergoing male-to-female gender reassignment report satisfaction with surgery to create a more feminine-appearing nose.

Smart insulin nanostructures pass feasibility test

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston have announced pre-clinical test results in the September issue of the International Journal of Nanomedicine demonstrating the feasibility of a smart particle insulin release system that detects spikes in glucose or blood sugar levels and releases insulin to counteract them.

Toshiba to demonstrate prototype of new 'SpursEngine' processor

Toshiba Corporation today announced development of the "SpursEngine", a high-performance stream processor integrating Synergistic Processing Element (SPE) cores derived from the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.). The SpursEngine is expressly designed to bring the powerful capabilities of the Cell/B.E. technology to consumer electronics, and to take video processing in digital consumer products to...