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134,520 articles from ScienceDaily

Greenland ice sheet faces irreversible melting

Scientists predict Greenland ice sheet will pass a threshold beyond which it will never fully regrow and sea levels will be permanently higher in as little as 600 years under current climate change projections, as Greenland's climate would be permanently altered as the ice sheet shrinks.

Healthy muscles are a carrot on a string for healthy lungs

Scientists show effectiveness of carrot-based Japanese herbal medicine called 'Ninjin'yoeito' in improving muscle atrophy in the hind legs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, positioning the medicine as a potential treatment for sarcopenia frailty-related complications with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Cancer cells 'remove blindfold' to spread

Cells are effectively 'blindfolded' as they lose sensitivity to their surroundings early in cancer progression, but scientists used a new method to find some cancer cells are able to switch this sense back on in order to move and spread. In future, these cells could potentially be targeted by treatments before cancer spreads to give patients a better chance of recovery.


TUESDAY 1. DECEMBER 2020


New method sees fibers in 3D, uses it to estimate conductivity

Designing a vehicle that can drive away the heat that is generated around it when traveling at hypersonic speeds requires an understanding of the thermal properties of the materials used to construct it. A recent study developed a method to create 3D models of the fibers within composite materials then used that information to predict the thermal conductivity of the material.

Shrinking massive neural networks used to model language

Deep learning neural networks can be massive, demanding major computing power. In a test of the 'lottery ticket hypothesis,' researchers have found leaner, more efficient subnetworks hidden within BERT models. The discovery could make natural language processing more accessible.

Researchers study influence of cultural factors on gesture design

Freehand gesture-based interfaces in interactive systems are becoming more common, but what if your preferred way to gesture a command - say, changing the TV to channel 10 - significantly differed from that of a user from another culture? Would the system recognize your command? Researchers explored this question and found that some gesture choices are significantly influenced by the cultural...