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154,972 articles from ScienceDaily

Longhorned tick discovered in northern Missouri

The Longhorned tick causes the loss of millions of dollars in agricultural revenue to cattle producers worldwide, and it is now in northern Missouri. Originally found in eastern Russia and the Australasian region, this tick was first found in the United States in 2017 in New Jersey. It has since reached the Mid-Atlantic, New England and Midwestern regions of the U.S., and now has been discovered...


FRIDAY 23. SEPTEMBER 2022


Asexual relationships need same ingredients as any other relationship

Many asexual individuals, those with little to no sexual attraction, are in long-term satisfying romantic relationships, but there has been little study on how and why they last and thrive. New research found that, despite asexuals' lack of or dislike for sexual attraction, the ingredients that make for a successful relationship among asexual individuals are virtually the same as those in any...

New research finds that viruses may have 'eyes and ears' on us

New research suggests that viruses are using information from their environment to 'decide' when to sit tight inside their hosts and when to multiply and burst out, killing the host cell. Right now, viruses are exploiting the ability to monitor their environment to their benefit. But in the future, 'we could exploit it to their detriment,' said one of the authors.

An AI message decoder based on bacterial growth patterns

A new encryption method uses simulated bacterial growth based on specific initial conditions to form patterns corresponding to letters. Depending on the initial conditions used, such as nutrient levels and space constraints, bacteria tend to grow in specific ways. Researchers have created a new type of encryption scheme based on how a virtual bacterial colony grows with specific initial...

An AI message decoder based on bacterial growth patterns

Depending on the initial conditions used, such as nutrient levels and space constraints, bacteria tend to grow in specific ways. Researchers have created a new type of encryption scheme based on how a virtual bacterial colony grows with specific initial conditions.

Intestinal fortitude: Gut coils hold secrets of organ formation

A new study finds that gut rotation during development is orchestrated by two waves of expression of a transcription factor called Pitx2. The second wave, it turns out, is triggered by mechanical cues within an elastic tissue that anchors the gut tube, and later becomes a conduit for blood and lymphatic vessels that supply the gut tube.

Shape-shifting fat cells fuel breast cancer growth

Fat cells, or adipocytes, that grow in close proximity to breast cancers can shift into other cell types that promote tumor growth, a new study suggests. The findings could lead to new ways to fight breast cancer, a disease that is diagnosed in more than 300,000 U.S. women each year and kills nearly 45,000 annually.

Researchers test a novel hypothesis to explain the cause of autoimmunity in patients with type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas makes little or no insulin. The details on the events that occur during autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta-cells have been studied extensively yet the mystery of what causes autoimmunity is unknown. In a new study, researchers present a testable hypothesis to explain the initiation of autoimmunity. If validated, this...

Tracking the origin of southern California's latest invasive pest

In 2012, a crop of California's most prized ornamental trees was overrun by an invisible invader. The growing shoots of coral beans -- the official city tree of Los Angeles -- began wilting and falling away, revealing stems that had been hollowed out from the inside by the caterpillars of Erythrina stem borer moths. A new study published this Wednesday in the Journal of Applied Entomology reveals...

Fighting fungal infections with metals

Researchers have demonstrated that chemical compounds containing special metals are highly effective in fighting dangerous fungal infections. These results could be used to develop innovative drugs which are effective against resistant bacteria and fungi.

Study findings suggest association between exposure to air pollution -- particularly in the first 5 years of life -- and alterations in brain structure

A study has found an association, in children aged 9-12, between exposure to air pollutants in the womb and during the first 8.5 years of life and alterations in white matter structural connectivity in the brain. The greater the child's exposure before age 5, the greater the brain structure alteration observed in preadolescence.

Researchers uncover how to 3D-print one of the strongest stainless steels

For airliners, cargo ships, nuclear power plants and other critical technologies, strength and durability are essential. This is why many contain a remarkably strong and corrosion-resistant alloy called 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) stainless steel. Now, for the first time ever, 17-4 PH steel can be consistently 3D-printed while retaining its favorable characteristics. Using high-energy X-rays...

Climate change is making lakes turn green-brown

If global warming persists, blue lakes worldwide are at risk of turning green-brown, according to a new study which presents the a global inventory of lake color. Shifts in lake water color can indicate a loss of ecosystem health. While substances such as algae and sediments can affect the color of lakes, the new study finds air temperature, precipitation, lake depth and elevation also play...

A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity

While not all impulsive behavior speaks of mental illness, a wide range of mental health disorders which often emerge in adolescence, including depression and substance abuse, have been linked to impulsivity. So, finding a way to identify and treat those who may be particularly vulnerable to impulsivity early in life is especially important. Researchers have developed a genetically based score...

It may already be too late to meet UN genetic diversity target, but new findings could guide conservation efforts

Climate change and habitat destruction may have already caused the loss of more than one-tenth of the world's terrestrial genetic diversity, according to new research. This means that it may already be too late to meet the United Nations' proposed target, announced last year, of protecting 90 percent of genetic diversity for every species by 2030, and that we have to act fast to prevent further...

Newly discovered COVID-like virus could infect humans, resist vaccines

A recently discovered virus in a Russian bat that is similar to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, is likely capable of infecting humans and, if it were to spillover, is resistant to current vaccines. Researchers found spike proteins from the bat virus, named Khosta-2, can infect human cells and is resistant to both the monoclonal antibodies and serum from individuals vaccinated for...

Deepest scientific ocean drilling sheds light on Japan's next great earthquake

Scientists who drilled deeper into an undersea earthquake fault than ever before have found that the tectonic stress in Japan's Nankai subduction zone is less than expected.  The findings are a puzzle but will help scientists home in on the link between tectonic forces and the earthquake cycle and potentially lead to better earthquake forecasts, both at Nankai and other megathrust faults such as...