833,896 articles

Scientists have developed a way to detect superparasites

Scientists have made a breakthrough in bridging high tech molecular biology research on microbial pathogens and the needs of the poorest of the poor. After sequencing the complete genome of Leishmania donovani (a parasite causing one of the most important tropical diseases after malaria) in hundreds of clinical isolates, they identified a series of mutations specific of ‘superparasites’ and...

You may never need to clean your car again, thanks to new coating technology

A new coating with self-repairing surface functionality has been developed. Researchers in the Netherlands have developed a coating with a surface that repairs itself after damage. This new coating has numerous potential applications -- for example mobile phones that will remain clean from fingerprints, cars that never need to be washed, and aircraft that need less frequent...

How Solving Media is Solving Crimes

It's not just prospective customers, partners or employers who may be scanning the social media landscape to glean information about you and your organization. The long arm of the law has joined the party as well, a new survey shows. So if you happen to have criminal intent, this might be a good time to lay low and forgo trolling for "Likes" on Facebook.

Short-term intestinal parasite infection triggers specific cytokines that can prevent the development of type 1 diabetes

Short-term infection with intestinal worms may provide long-term protection against type I diabetes (TID), suggests a new study. The incidence of TID is relatively low in developing countries. One explanation for this phenomenon is the prevalence of chronic intestinal worm infections, which dampen the self-aggressive T cells that cause diabetes and other autoimmune...

'Deflector Shields' protect the Lunar Surface

(Phys.org) -- Scientists from RAL Space at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have solved a lunar mystery and their results might lead the way to determining if the same mechanism could be artificially manipulated to create safe havens for future space explorers.  Their work focussed on the origin of the enigmatic "lunar swirls" - swirling patches of relatively pale lunar soil, some measuring...

Biodiesel can cut greenhouse gas emissions

Researchers in Spain have discovered that greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced through the use of biodiesel. The group from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) in Spain investigated the benefits of using biodiesel by analyzing and quantifying primary and fossil energy consumption on urban buses, as well as by analyzing greenhouse gas emissions. The findings, said the researchers, could...

Cassini spots daytime lightning on Saturn

(Phys.org) -- Saturn was playing the lightning storm blues. NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured images of last year's storm on Saturn, the largest storm seen up-close at the planet, with bluish spots in the middle of swirling clouds. Those bluish spots indicate flashes of lightning and mark the first time scientists have detected lightning in visible wavelengths on the side of Saturn...

Chemist improves accuracy of oral cancer detection

(Phys.org) -- One of the hallmarks of cancer is that it often doesn’t show itself until it’s too late. But now Professor James Rusling of the chemistry department has developed a method that detects with high accuracy the presence of multiple proteins in the bloodstream indicating that a person has oral cancer.

Gauging the forces between cells

Cell-cell junctions are important for communication, transport, signalling, waste evacuation and water homeostasis. An European project has investigated how biophysical forces can influence the fulfilment of this vast range of functions.

Lausanne's statues - in 3D

During a semester, a class of EPFL Master’s students took photographs of Lausanne’s statues and then modeled them in three dimensions to create a virtual museum.

Modern life, at a cost

Looking for a not-so-light summer read? In July and August, the Gazette will showcase recent books by Harvard authors.

More ice breaks off of Petermann Glacier

(Phys.org) -- The Petermann Glacier grinds and slides toward the sea along the northwestern coast of Greenland, terminating in a giant floating ice tongue. Like other glaciers that end in the ocean, Petermann periodically calves icebergs. A massive iceberg, or ice island, broke off of the Petermann Glacier in 2010. Nearly two years later, another chunk of ice has broken free.

NASA completes another successful Orion parachute test

(Phys.org) -- NASA completed another successful test Wednesday of the Orion crew vehicle's parachutes high above the Arizona desert in preparation for the spacecraft’s orbital flight test in 2014. Orion will carry astronauts deeper into space than ever before, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and ensure a safe re-entry and landing.

New study finds fastest-growing cities not the most prosperous

As communities seek new ways to emerge from the recession, many may look to growing their population as a strategy. However, the belief that population growth will bring jobs and economic prosperity for local residents is a myth. These findings are published in a new study in the latest issue of Economic Development Quarterly.

New ultracapacitor delivers a jolt of energy at a constant voltage

Chemical batteries power many different mobile electronic devices, but repeated charging and discharging cycles can wear them out. An alternative energy storage device called an ultracapacitor can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times without degrading, but ultracapacitors have their own disadvantages, including a voltage output that drops precipitously as the device is discharged. Now a...