890,651 articles

Seeing inside the nose of an aircraft

Radio signals reach pilots on board an aircraft through the "radar dome", the rounded nose of the aircraft. But if errors occur during the production of this "nose", - tiny foreign particles, drops of water or air bubbles - this can impede radio traffic. In the future, a non-destructive testing system will identify just such imperfections during production. Researchers will be presenting the new...

Small molecular bodyguards kill HPV-infected cancer cells by protecting tumor-suppressor

Researchers at the Wistar Institute announce the discovery of small molecules that kill cancer cells caused by infection with human papillomavirus. Their results, in both cell and mouse models, demonstrate that the small molecule inhibitors protect a tumor-suppressing protein targeted by viral proteins, thus killing the infected tumor cells. The researchers believe that, with further testing and...

Smalleye pigmy sharks' bellies shine

Smalleye pigmy sharks have an eye-catching party trick: Their bellies glow. However, instead of being a giveaway, Julien Claes and Jérôme Mallefet from Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, have shown that the fish's shiny undersides probably provide camouflage. They also discovered that the pigmy shark and another glowing fish, the lantern shark, regulate their glow using the similar...

Stem cell researchers map new knowledge about insulin production

Scientists from the Danish Stem Cell Center at the University of Copenhagen and Hagedorn Research Institute have gained new insight into the signaling paths that control the body's insulin production. This is important knowledge with respect to their final goal: The conversion of stem cells into insulin-producing beta cells that can be implanted into patients who need them. The research results...

Striatal brain volume predicts Huntington disease onset

Using data from the ongoing PREDICT-HD study and led by Dr. Elizabeth Aylward, author and Associate Director at the Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, researchers examined whether neuroimaging measures can improve the accuracy of prediction of disease onset.

Study explores link between smoking during pregnancy, autism

Women who smoke in pregnancy may be more likely to have a child with high-functioning autism, such as Asperger's disorder, according to preliminary findings from a study published online by the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. The study is one of several the journal published April 25 on possible environmental links to autism.

The Generation X report

Generation X adults prepare an average of 10 meals a week, and eat out or buy fast food an average of three times a week, according to a University of Michigan report that details the role food plays in the lives of Americans born between 1961 and 1981.

Translocation risks revealed

Disastrous disease outbreaks like the one which led to the decimation of the red squirrel in Britain can now be avoided through the implementation of new preventive measures developed by UK scientists.

University of Nevada, Reno first to show transgenerational effect of antibiotics

In a paper published today in Nature's open access journal Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno report that male pseudoscorpions treated with the antibiotic tetracycline suffer significantly reduced sperm viability and pass this toxic effect on to their untreated sons. They suggest that a similar effect could occur in humans and other species.

Why do the different people's bodies react differently to a high-fat diet?

A diet rich in greasy foods causes an imbalance in our gut flora. The composition of the gut flora seems to determine the way in which the body develops certain metabolic disorders such as diabetes, regardless of any genetic modification, gender, age or specific diet. This has recently been demonstrated by Rémy Burcelin and Matteo Serino, researchers from the Inserm unit 1048 "Institute of...

Women have bigger pupils than men

From an anatomical point of view, a normal, non-pathological eye is known as an emmetropic eye, and has been studied very little until now in comparison with myopic and hypermetropic eyes. The results show that healthy emmetropic women have a wider pupil diameter than men.