829,918 articles

NASA's EPOXI mission sets up for comet flyby

On Sept. 29, 2010, navigators and mission controllers for NASA's EPOXI mission watched their computer screens as 23.6 million kilometers (14.7 million miles) away, their spacecraft successfully performed its 20th trajectory correction maneuver. The maneuver refined the spacecraft's orbit, setting the stage for its flyby of comet Hartley 2 on Nov....

NASA's Webb telescope MIRI instrument takes one step closer to space

A major instrument due to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is getting its first taste of space in the test facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the United Kingdom. The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI) has been designed to contribute to areas of investigation as diverse as the first light in the early Universe and the formation of planets around other stars.

New approach for treating dry mouth presented in study published in October 2010 issue of JADA

A newly published study in the October 2010 issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association, conducted at New York University's College of Dentistry, confirms the safety and efficacy of a new novel method for controlling xerostomia, or dry mouth. The study concludes that use of a mucoadhesive patch, affixed to the hard palate inside the mouth, provides statistically significant and...

New league table of Spanish savings banks created

Researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia have produced a new league table of Spanish savings banks based on economic, financial and social criteria. This is the first study of these characteristics carried out in Spain, and the data used come from the savings banks' annual accounts for 2007.

Newly discovered planet may be first truly habitable exoplanet

A team of planet hunters has announced the discovery of an Earth-sized planet orbiting a nearby star at a distance that places it squarely in the middle of the star's "habitable zone," where liquid water could exist on the planet's surface. If confirmed, this would be the most Earth-like exoplanet yet discovered and the first strong case for a potentially habitable one.

October 2010 Geosphere highlights

This month's themed issue, "Advances in 3-D imaging and analysis of geomaterials," edited by Guilherme A.R. Gualda, Don R. Baker, and Margherita Polacci, features papers from the 2009 AGU Joint Assembly session "Advances in 3-D Imaging and Analysis of Rocks and Other Earth Materials." Studies include 3-D imaging and analysis techniques for Wild 2 comet material returned from the NASA Stardust...

Parkinson's disease: Excess of special protein identified as key to symptoms and possible new target for treatment with widely used anti-cancer drug imatinib

Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that the over-activation of a single protein may shut down the brain-protecting effects of a molecule and facilitate the most common form of Parkinson's disease. The finding of this mechanism could lead to important new targets for drugs already known to inhibit it, thus controlling symptoms of the disorder, which affects about 1 million older Americans.

Pension reform vital to maintaining Canadians' standard of living

As baby boomers retire in greater numbers, serious doubts continue to be raised about the ability of the retirement income system to provide adequate replacement wages for the next generation of Canadians. According to a new study conducted by a Concordia University researcher for the Institute for Research on Public Policy, our country can learn valuable policy lessons from recent pension reforms...

Research identifies a new bacterial foe in CF

Exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, or CF, may be linked to chronic infection with a bacterium called Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, which was previously thought to simply colonize the CF lung. The finding that chronic infection with S. maltophilia is independently linked with an increased risk of exacerbations gives clinicians and researchers a new potential measure of the health status of CF...

Researchers engineer adult stem cells that do not age

Biomedical researchers at the University at Buffalo have engineered adult stem cells that scientists can grow continuously in culture, a discovery that could speed development of cost-effective treatments for diseases including heart disease, diabetes, immune disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

Researchers find no difference in drugs for macular degeneration

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine and the VA Boston Healthcare System have conducted a study that failed to show a difference in efficacy between Bevacizumab (Avastin) and Ranibizumab (Lucentis) for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The study, which appears currently online in Eye, is believed to be the first study to describe one-year outcomes of a...

Severe food allergies turned off in mice

Scientists have discovered a way to turn off the immune system's allergic reaction to certain food proteins in mice, a discovery that could have implications for the millions of people who suffer severe reactions to foods, such as peanuts and milk.

Study shows real partners are no match for ideal mate

Our ideal image of the perfect partner differs greatly from our real-life partner, according to new research from the University of Sheffield and the University of Montpellier in France. The research found that our actual partners are of a different height, weight and body mass index than those we would ideally choose.

Think saturated fat contributes to heart disease? Think again

For the past three decades, saturated fat has been considered a major culprit of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and as a result dietary advice persists in recommending reduced consumption of this macronutrient. However, new evidence shows that saturated fat intake has only a very limited impact on CVD risk -- causing many to rethink the "saturated fat is bad" paradigm.