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200,587 articles from PhysOrg


FRIDAY 27. MARCH 2020


Quantum copycat: Researchers find a new way in which bosons behave like fermions

Bosons and fermions, the two classes into which all particles—from the sub-atomic to atoms themselves—can be sorted, behave very differently under most circumstances. While identical bosons like to congregate, identical fermions tend to be antisocial. However, in one dimension—imagine particles that can only move on a line—bosons can become as stand-offish as fermions, so that no two...

Copper boosts pig growth, and now we know why

Pigs have better feed conversion rates with copper in their diets, but until now, scientists didn't fully understand why. Existing research from the University of Illinois shows copper doesn't change fat and energy absorption from the diet. Instead, according to new research, the element seems to enhance pigs' ability to utilize fat after absorption, resulting in increased energy utilization of...

A lifesaving reason to have more women on boards: ensuring consumer safety

In a study published online yesterday focused on the medical products industry—which includes medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biologics—a group of researchers found that, compared to firms with all-male boards, firms with female directors announced high-severity product recalls 28 days sooner. This is a 35% reduction in the time between when a firm was first made aware of the defect and...

Bubbles go with the flow: Simulating behavior of fluids moving through pipes

Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, used a sophisticated physical model to simulate the behavior of fluids moving through pipes. By including the possibility of shear-induced bubble formation, they find that, contrary to the assumptions of many previous works, fluids can experience significant slippage when in contact with fixed boundaries. This research...

Multi-stage deformation process in high-entropy alloys at ultra-low temperatures revealed

An international research team led by scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered that high-entropy alloys (HEAs) exhibit exceptional mechanical properties at ultra-low temperatures due to the coexistence of multiple deformation mechanisms. Their discovery may hold the key to designing new structural materials for applications at low temperatures.

Researchers take a big step towards a comprehensive single-cell atlas

A large team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in and around Hangzhou, China, has taken a very large step toward the creation of a comprehensive human single-cell atlas. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how they sequenced the RNA of over a half-million single cells donated by volunteers and processed the information to present it in a way that...

Researchers catch light in a funnel

Professor Ronny Thomale holds a chair for theoretical condensed matter physics, the TP1, at the Julius-Maximilian University of Würzburg. The discovery and theoretical description of new quantum states of matter is a prime objective of his research. "Developing a theory for a new physical phenomenon which then inspires new experiments seeking after this effect is one of the biggest moments in a...

Animals keep viruses in the sea in balance

A variety of sea animals can take up virus particles while filtering seawater for oxygen and food. Sponges are particularly efficient. That was written by marine ecologist Jennifer Welsh from NIOZ this week, in a publication in Nature Scientific Reports. This Monday, Welsh will defend her thesis at the Free University of Amsterdam, through an online connection.

ALMA resolves gas impacted by young jets from supermassive black hole

Astronomers obtained the first resolved image of disturbed gaseous clouds in a galaxy 11 billion light-years away by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The team found that the disruption is caused by young powerful jets ejected from a supermassive black hole residing at the center of the host galaxy. This result will cast light on the mystery of the evolutionary process...

Free range mitochondria are coming for you

Transfer of mitochondria between cells is a ubiquitously occurring and now universally known phenomenon. For years, researchers have been serially demonstrating that one particular new cell type can transfer its mitos to yet another particular cell type to achieve some specific metabolic goal essential to survival of the meta-host organism. But what happens when the mitochondria come from the...

A new 'gold standard' for safer ceramic coatings

Making your own ceramics can be a way to express your creativity, but some techniques and materials used in the process could spell bad news for your health and the environment. If not prepared properly, some glazed ceramics can leach potentially harmful heavy metals. Scientists now report progress toward a new type of glaze that includes gold and silver nanoparticles, which are less toxic and...

Scientists grow novel Er3+ doped LuSGG mid-infrared laser crystal

A study team has grown an Er3+-doped lutetium scandium gallium garnet crystal with high doping concentration. And this was the first time to grow that kind of crystal by Czochralski method. The team also announced they have achieved 2.79 μm laser with high peak power and high beam quality.

The unintended consequences of stockpiling: food waste

There's now £1 billion more food in people's houses than three weeks ago. This consumer stockpiling has led to unavailability of products for others, and there's a real danger that if this food isn't eaten, we will see huge amounts of food waste.