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225,310 articles from PhysOrg

Berkeley Lab's CAMERA leads international effort on autonomous scientific discoveries

Experimental facilities around the globe are facing a challenge: their instruments are becoming increasingly powerful, leading to a steady increase in the volume and complexity of the scientific data they collect. At the same time, these tools demand new, advanced algorithms to take advantage of these capabilities and enable ever-more intricate scientific questions to be asked—and answered. For...

Automatically steering experiments toward scientific discovery

In the popular view of traditional science, scientists are in the lab hovering over their experiments, micromanaging every little detail. For example, they may iteratively test a wide variety of material compositions, synthesis and processing protocols, and environmental conditions to see how these parameters influence material properties. In each iteration, they analyze the collected data,...

Common floral bacteria can induce pollen germination

Certain species of floral bacteria can enhance pollen germination, according to a study published today from the University of California, Davis in the journal Current Biology."This is the first paper documenting stimulation of pollen germination by non-plants," said first author Shawn Christensen, a doctoral candidate in associate professor Rachel Vannette's laboratory in the Department of...

Non-linear effects in coupled optical microcavities

Scientists from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw have demonstrated exciton-polariton lasing and parametric scattering of exciton-polaritons in a system of coupled optical microcavities. The results have been published in the prestigious journal Nanophotonics.

Exploring blood types of Neanderthal and Denisovan individuals

An analysis of the blood types of one Denisovan and three Neanderthal individuals has uncovered new clues to the evolutionary history, health, and vulnerabilities of their populations. Silvana Condemi of the Centre National de la Research Scientifique (CNRS) and colleagues at Aix-Marseille University, France, present hese findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 28, 2021.

Molecular atlas reveals how brain cells develop

As the fertilized egg divides, initially undifferentiated cells take on specific functions, becoming more distinct as different tissues and organs emerge. Understanding how hundreds of disparate cell types arise has proven difficult, largely because scientists have lacked the technologies to capture cellular decision making over time.

Water as a metal

Under normal conditions, pure water is an almost perfect insulator. Water only develops metallic properties under extreme pressure, such as exists deep inside of large planets. Now, an international collaboration has used a completely different approach to produce metallic water and documented the phase transition at BESSY II. The study is published now in Nature.

Double-strand RNA exhibits traits different from single-stranded RNA

Messenger RNA, or mRNA, has been in the news recently as a crucial component of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. The nucleic acid looks, for all intents and purposes, like a strand of DNA that has been sliced the long way. It's what's known as single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), and it can be found throughout the natural world.