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126,289 articles from ScienceDaily

Sulfur 'spices' alien atmospheres

They say variety is the spice of life, and now new discoveries suggest that a certain elemental 'variety' -- sulfur -- is indeed a 'spice' that can perhaps point to signs of life.

Autoimmunity-associated heart dilation tied to heart-failure risk in type 1 diabetes

In people with type 1 diabetes without known cardiovascular disease, the presence of autoantibodies against heart muscle proteins was associated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evidence of increased volume of the left ventricle (the heart's main pumping chamber), increased muscle mass, and reduced pumping function (ejection fraction), features that are associated with higher risk of...

Targeting tumors: Synthesis against the clock

Radiolabeled molecules help nuclear physicians to detect and precisely target tumors, which are often developing due to pathological changes in metabolic processes. Using positron emission tomography, scientists have now developed the first radiotracer labelled with the fluorine isotope 18F, which can visualize special transport proteins often found in the cell membranes of cancer cells. The...

COVID-19: On average only 6% of actual SARS-CoV-2 infections detected worldwide

The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus disease officially issued by countries dramatically understates the true number of infections, a report suggests. Researchers used estimates of COVID-19 mortality and time until death from a recent study to test the quality of records. This shows that countries have only discovered on average about 6% of infections. The number of infections worldwide...

X-rays reveal in situ crystal growth of lead-free perovskite solar panel materials

Lead-based perovskites efficiently turn light into electricity but they also present some major drawbacks: the most efficient materials are not very stable, while lead is a toxic element. Scientists are studying alternatives to lead-based perovskites. It is very important to investigate in situ how lead-free perovskite crystals form and how the crystal structure affects the functioning of the...

Breakthrough in unlocking genetic potential of ocean microbes

Researchers have made a major breakthrough in developing gene-editing tools to improve our understanding of one of the most important ocean microbes on the planet. The international project unlocks the potential of the largest untapped genetic resource for the development of natural products such as novel antibacterial, antiviral, anti-parasitic and antifungal compounds.

Shorter radiotherapy treatment for bowel cancer patients during COVID-19

An international panel of cancer experts has recommended a one-week course of radiotherapy and delaying surgery as the best way to treat patients with bowel cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. The short course of treatment involves higher-intensity radiation rather than five weeks of radiotherapy coupled with chemotherapy. Surgery, which normally happens one to two weeks after radiotherapy, can...

Invasive species with charisma have it easier

It's the outside that counts: Their charisma has an impact on the introduction and image of alien species and can even hinder their control. An international research team have investigated the influence of charisma on the management of invasive species.

Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants

Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown. Using a range of advanced imaging tools, functional assays and proteomic analyses, a study by the University of Bristol has identified new ways in which nanopillars can damage bacteria.

Making stronger concrete with 'sewage-enhanced' steel slag

Researchers examined whether steel slag that had been used to treat wastewater could then be recycled as an aggregate material for concrete. Their findings? Concrete made with post-treatment steel slag was about 17% stronger than concrete made with conventional aggregates, and 8% stronger than raw steel slag.