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126,130 articles from ScienceDaily

How at risk are you of getting a virus on an airplane?

Fair or not, airplanes have a reputation for germs. However, there are ways to minimize the risks. This research is especially used for air travel where there is an increased risk for contagious infection or disease, such as the recent worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus, which causes COVID-19 disease.

Unique structural fluctuations at ice surface promote autoionization of water molecules

Hydrated protons at the surface of water ice are of fundamental importance in a variety of physicochemical phenomena on earth and in the universe. Hydrated protons can be introduced by the autoionization of water molecules; thus, the autoionization and subsequent proton transfer processes determine the proton activity inherent to water molecular systems. A recent experimental study on the H/D...

Hidden messages in protein blueprints

Scientists have identified a new control mechanism that enables stem cells to adapt their activity in emergency situations. For this purpose, the stem cells simultaneously modify the blueprints for hundreds of proteins encoded in the gene transcripts. In this way, they control the amount of protein produced and can also control the formation of certain proteinisoforms. If this mechanism is...

Air pollution linked to dementia and cardiovascular disease

People continuously exposed to air pollution are at increased risk of dementia, especially if they also suffer from cardiovascular diseases, according to a new study. Therefore, patients with cardiovascular diseases who live in polluted environments may require additional support from care providers to prevent dementia, according to the researchers.

How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival

While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. A neurobiologist explored the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly.

Extreme, high temperatures may double or triple heart-related deaths

In Kuwait, a country known for hot weather, death certificates reveal that on days when the temperatures reached extremes of an average daily temperature of 109 degrees Fahrenheit, the number of deaths from cardiovascular disease dramatically increased. With unprecedentedly high temperatures, people living in inherently hot regions of the world may be at particularly high risk of heat-related...

How social media makes it difficult to identify real news

There's a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests. The study found that people viewing a blend of news and entertainment on a social media site tended to pay less attention to the source of content they consumed - meaning they could easily mistake satire or fiction for real news.

What are you looking at? 'Virtual' communication in the age of social distancing

When discussions occur face-to-face, people know where their conversational partner is looking and vice versa. With ''virtual'' communication due to COVID-19 and the expansive use of mobile and video devices, now more than ever, it's important to understand how these technologies impact communication. Where do people focus their attention? The eyes, mouth, the whole face? And how do they encode...


FRIDAY 27. MARCH 2020


In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction

Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that the terrestrial extinctions from Gondwana occurred at the same time as the better-documented marine extinctions. But a new study provides more precise dates for South African fossils and points to a long, perhaps 400,000-year period of extinction on land...

Bubbles go with the flow

Scientists have developed a new computer simulation model that includes microbubble nucleation to explain the flow slippage of fluids inside pipes. This work may help improve the flow rate of viscous fluids in commercial applications, as in the energy industry.