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139,747 articles from ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence makes great microscopes better than ever

Collaboration between deep learning experts and microscopy experts leads to an significantly improved data-intensive light-field microscopy method by using AI and ground-truthing it with light-sheet microscopy. The result is the power of light-field microscopy available to biologists in near real time vs. days or weeks, AND the expansion of biologists' ability to use this microscopy for many...

The legume family tree

The most comprehensive study of the family tree for legumes, the plant family that includes beans, soybeans, peanuts, and many other economically important crop plants, reveals a history of whole-genome duplications.


FRIDAY 7. MAY 2021


Damage to white matter is linked to worse cognitive outcomes after brain injury

A new study challenges the idea that gray matter (the neurons that form the cerebral cortex) is more important than white matter (the myelin covered axons that physically connect neuronal regions) when it comes to cognitive health and function. The findings may help neurologists better predict the long-term effects of strokes and other forms of traumatic brain injury.

Breaching the blood-brain barrier to deliver precious payloads

RNA-based drugs may change the standard of care for many diseases, making personalized medicine a reality. So far these cost-effective, easy-to-manufacture drugs haven't been very useful in treating brain tumors and other brain disease. But a team has shown that a combination of ultrasound and RNA-loaded nanoparticles can temporarily open the protective blood-brain barrier, allowing the delivery...

The African wild dog: An ambassador for the world's largest terrestrial conservation area

The world's largest terrestrial conservation area is located in southern Africa and covers 520,000 square kilometers spanning five countries. A study now shows that the endangered African wild dog mostly remains within the boundaries of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) when dispersing, thus highlighting the relevance of such a large-scale conservation initiative for...

Migratory songbirds climb to extreme altitudes during daytime

Great reed warblers normally migrate by night during its month-long migration from northern Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa. However, researchers have now discovered that during the few occasions when it continues to fly during daytime, it flies at extremely high altitudes (up to 6300 meters). One possible explanation for this unexpected and consistent behaviour could be that the birds want to avoid...

Protecting coral from heat stress and coral bleaching

Coral bleaching, which is becoming stronger and more frequent due to heat stress, has already wiped out corals at many locations globally. With the help of a microbiome-targeting strategy, it could become feasible to help protect corals from heat stress.

How we retrieve our knowledge about the world

In order to find our way in the world, we classify it into concepts, such as 'telephone'. Until now, it was unclear how the brain retrieves these when we only encounter the word and don't perceive the objects directly. Scientists have now developed a model of how the brain processes abstract knowledge. They found that depending on which features one concentrates on, the corresponding brain regions...

Learning on the fly

Informatics experts have developed a new computational model that demonstrates a long sought after link between insect and mammalian learning.

Sugar-sweetened drinks linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer in women under 50, study finds

Colorectal cancer diagnoses have increased among people under age 50 in recent years and researchers are seeking reasons why. A new study has found a link between drinking sugar-sweetened beverages and an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer in women under age 50. The findings suggest that heavy consumption of sugary drinks during adolescence (ages 13 to 18) and adulthood can increase...


THURSDAY 6. MAY 2021


PCB contamination in Icelandic orcas: a matter of diet

A new study suggests that some Icelandic killer whales have very high concentrations of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) in their blubber. But it seems that other orcas from the same population have levels of PCBs that are much lower. It mainly depends on what they eat.

Swiping, swabbing elevates processing plant food safety

By swiping surfaces in commercial food processing plants with specially designed rapid-testing adenosine triphospate (ATP) swabs -- which produce a light similar to the glow of fireflies in the presence of microorganisms -- spoilage and foodborne illness could diminish, according to a new study.

Scrap for cash before coins

How did people living in the Bronze Age manage their finances before money became widespread? Researchers ave discovered that bronze scrap found in hoards in Europe circulated as a currency. These pieces of scrap -- which might include swords, axes, and jewellery broken into pieces -- were used as cash in the late Bronze Age, and in fact complied with a weight system used across Europe.