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3,983 articles from TIME

A New Space Pact Seeks to Ensure Peace and Prosperity—on the Moon

Laws have long been portable things. Human beings settled frontiers with tools and muscle—and too often with weapons, seizing lands that belong to others. One other thing the settlers also brought along were their legal systems, rules of the road to govern their behavior in the new communities they built. That was true when all our exploring was terrestrial, and it remained true when we...

Russian-U.S. Crew Launches on Fast Track to the Space Station

(MOSCOW) — A trio of space travelers has launched successfully to the International Space Station, for the first time using a fast-track maneuver to reach the orbiting outpost in just three hours. NASA’s Kate Rubins along with Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos lifted off as scheduled Wednesday morning from the Russia-leased Baikonur space...


FRIDAY 9. OCTOBER 2020



THURSDAY 8. OCTOBER 2020


Camera Designed by Felix & Paul Studios and TIME Arrives at ISS to Capture First-Ever Virtual Reality Spacewalk

It’s entirely possible you missed it, but on Oct. 2 at 9:16 PM ET, you lifted off for the International Space Station. Just over two days later, you docked successfully—and it’s a good thing you did. You’ve got a spacewalk planned for later this year. O.K., technically speaking, you didn’t go anywhere at all, and unless you’re actually a highly-trained...


WEDNESDAY 7. OCTOBER 2020


The 2020 Physics Nobel Winners Helped Us Better Understand the Universe’s Most Mysterious Phenomenon

An awful lot of time elapsed between the day Roger Penrose was walking to work in 1964 and the moment his phone rang while he was in the shower on the morning of Oct. 6, 2020. Back then, his walk was interrupted by “some strange feeling of elation,” as he told the Associated Press yesterday, about the moment he had his first glimmers of insight into the equations that would...

Siberia Burned. Arctic Ice Shrank. This Was the World’s Hottest September Ever

Well, we’ve done it again. Last month was the warmest September on record, blazing past September 2019’s record global average by 0.05°C, and 2016’s by 0.08°C, according to the latest report from the European Commission-backed Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), which tracks global climate trends. If you’re not surprised given past trends, you’re not...

Nobel Prize for Chemistry Awarded for ‘Genome Scissors’

(STOCKHOLM) — French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to “molecular scissors” that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. “There is enormous...


TUESDAY 6. OCTOBER 2020


American Andrea Ghez and 2 Others Win Nobel Prize in Physics

(STOCKHOLM) — Three physicists have won this year’s Nobel Prize in physics for black hole discoveries. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Tuesday that Briton Roger Penrose will receive half of this year’s prize “for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity.” Goran K. Hansson, the academy’s...

It’s Been 25 Years Since We Found the First Exoplanet. Now We Know of Thousands—and Some Could Harbor Life

Nobody gives out awards for Worst Planet in the Galaxy—and it would be a dubious honor at best. Somewhere out there may be other garden planets like Earth. Somewhere too may be near-miss worlds like Mars. And somewhere out there are planets like 51 Pegasi b which, if it didn’t win the Worst Planet nod, would surely make it to the medal round. Located about 50 light years from Earth,...


MONDAY 5. OCTOBER 2020


3 Win Nobel Medicine Prize for Discovering Hepatitis C Virus

(STOCKHOLM) — Americans Harvey J. Alter and Charles M. Rice and British-born scientist Michael Houghton won the Nobel Prize for medicine on Monday for their discovery of the hepatitis C virus, a major source of liver disease that affects millions worldwide. Announcing the prize in Stockholm, the Nobel Committee noted that the trio’s work identified a major source of blood-borne...


WEDNESDAY 23. SEPTEMBER 2020


Republicans Claim Addressing Climate Change Is Too Expensive. Americans Aren’t Buying It, a New Poll Shows

“It’s too expensive.” Republicans have uttered this refrain time and again to reject nearly every proposal aimed at addressing climate change. It’s what drove the U.S. rejection of global climate deals in the 1990s and essentially the only context in which the Trump campaign brings up climate change today. But few Americans are buying it, a new poll shows. Nearly half of...


MONDAY 21. SEPTEMBER 2020


Donald Trump’s Campaign Crafted a Careful Climate Message. Trump Ignored It

For months, the Trump campaign’s public statements and the President’s prepared remarks have repeated a message on climate change carefully calibrated not to alienate Republicans worried about the health of the planet: regardless of the science, Democratic plans to address the issue are too expensive. Last week, President Trump disregarded his own campaign’s meticulous...

‘A Climate Emergency Unfolding Before Our Eyes.’ Arctic Sea Ice Has Shrunk to Almost Historic Levels

From the bridge of the Arctic Sunrise, an old ice-breaking fishing trawler turned research vessel now plying the polar waters between Greenland and northern Norway, Laura Meller has an unparalleled view of our planet’s future. It is both gorgeous, and terrifying. The early autumn sunlight bathes the scattered icebergs in soft pink and orange hues that glimmer with the gentle swell....


TUESDAY 15. SEPTEMBER 2020


Signs of Life on Venus Hint at Biology Pretty Much Anywhere in the Universe

To go to Venus is to go to hell. One of the most brilliant and beautiful objects in the night sky, Venus is a near twin of Earth in size and mass but it is radically different in almost every other way. Its surface temperature averages 470º C (880º F), or hot enough to melt lead. Its atmosphere is 96% carbon dioxide, with a ground-level pressure 90 times greater than that on...

How Climate Change May Be Contributing to Our Political Instability

If you pick up the newspaper these days, it’s hard not to be overwhelmed by the headlines: historic wildfires, a deadly pandemic and an impending U.S. election unlike any in recent memory. When you take a step back, it seems a bit like the fabric of society is fraying. Climate change isn’t entirely responsible for any of these problems, but there is a growing body of literature...


MONDAY 14. SEPTEMBER 2020


Astronomers Find Potential Sign of Life in Venus’ Atmosphere

Astronomers have found a potential sign of life high in the atmosphere of neighboring Venus: hints there may be bizarre microbes living in the sulfuric acid-laden clouds of the hothouse planet. Two telescopes in Hawaii and Chile spotted in the thick Venutian clouds the chemical signature of phosphine, a noxious gas that on Earth is only associated with life, according to a study in...


SUNDAY 6. SEPTEMBER 2020



WEDNESDAY 2. SEPTEMBER 2020



WEDNESDAY 26. AUGUST 2020


Artificial Intelligence Is Here To Calm Your Road Rage

I am behind the wheel of a Nissan Leaf, circling a parking lot, trying not to let the day’s nagging worries and checklists distract me to the point of imperiling pedestrians. Like all drivers, I am unwittingly communicating my stress to this vehicle in countless subtle ways: the strength of my grip on the steering wheel, the slight expansion of my back against the seat as I breathe, the...


TUESDAY 25. AUGUST 2020


How Science is Revolutionizing the World of Dog Training

I was about a month into raising a new border collie puppy, Alsea, when I came to an embarrassing realization: my dog had yet to meet a Black person. This was worrying for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that it forced me to admit I have next to zero Black…


MONDAY 24. AUGUST 2020


Local Economies Have Been Decimated by the Coronavirus—But This Is Just a Preview of What Climate Change Could Do

This summer has been a cruel one in the American Sunbelt. In our hospitals, pain, fear and death abound because of COVID-19. Outside, a mass of restive, unemployed workers face down deadly heat waves, swiftly rising sea levels and the peak of hurricane season. But even if the viral hardship feels wanton, it doesn’t have to be without purpose. In South Florida, Phoenix and the Rio Grande...

An Ohio Artist and Activist is Turning Acid Mine Pollution Into Paint

Sunday Creek begins around Corning, a small town in southeastern Ohio, before snaking down 27 miles to connect with the Hocking River. Like much of Appalachia, the creek’s watershed was historically home to communities of coal miners, but the mines have since closed, leaving only their runoff: nearly 1,000 gal. a minute of water so…


WEDNESDAY 19. AUGUST 2020


COVID-19 Could Threaten Firefighters As Wildfire Season Ramps Up

Jon Paul was leery entering his first wildfire camp of the year late last month to fight three lightning-caused fires scorching parts of a Northern California forest that hadn’t burned in 40 years. The 54-year-old engine captain from southern Oregon knew from experience that these crowded, grimy camps can be breeding grounds for norovirus and a respiratory illness that firefighters call...