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151,372 articles from ScienceDaily


MONDAY 23. MAY 2022


Microbes can degrade the toughest PFAS

Engineers now report selective breakdown of a particularly stubborn class of PFAS called fluorinated carboxylic acids (FCAs) by common microorganisms. Under anaerobic conditions, a carbon-carbon double bond is crucial for the shattering the ultra-strong carbon-fluorine bond by microbial communities. The resulting products could be relayed to other microorganisms for defluorination under in aerobic...

Charting a safe course through a highly uncertain environment

Researchers have developed a trajectory-planning system for autonomous vehicles that enables them to travel from a starting point to a target location safely, even when there are many different uncertainties in the environment, such as unknown variations in the shapes, sizes, and locations of obstacles.

Small adaptations, major effect: Researchers study potential of future public transportation

Being mobile individually, at any time -- without owning a car: To facilitate this, public transportation authorities cooperate with service providers for new forms of mobility such as bicycle sharing, car sharing, or ridepooling. Researchers have studied how publicly available mobility options in the Karlsruhe region in the future can optimally fulfill the citizens' needs. The result: Widespread...

Bacteria can live in snake and spider venoms

Newly published research shows that, contrary to what is commonly believed, the venom of snakes and spiders is actually populated with microbes, including bacteria that could cause infection in people who have suffered a bite.

New CRISPR-combo boosts genome editing power in plants

Scientists have developed CRISPR-Combo, a method to edit multiple genes in plants while simultaneously changing the expression of other genes. This new tool will enable genetic engineering combinations that work together to boost functionality and improve breeding of new crops.

Diamond mirrors for high-powered lasers

Researchers have built a mirror out of one of the strongest materials on the planet: diamond. By etching nanostructures onto the surface of a thin sheet of diamond, the research team built a highly reflective mirror that withstood, without damage, experiments with a 10-kilowatt Navy laser. In the future, the researchers envision these mirrors being used for defense applications, semiconductor...

Genetic test can diagnose certain immune system disorders

Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) can result in chronic and sometimes life-threatening infections. More than 450 PIDs have been described, but timely and accurate diagnoses remain a challenge. In a new study investigators used next-generation sequencing technology to test a DNA panel of 130 different immune system genes from 22 study participants. They found that many patients had inherited...

Skydiving salamanders live in world's tallest trees

Researchers have documented in a vertical wind tunnel the amazing ability of one species of salamander -- which spends its entire life in the tops of redwoods -- to parachute, glide and maneuver in mid-air. Ground-dwellers, on the other hand, freak out during free-fall. The salamander's skydiving skills are likely a way to steer back to a tree it has fallen or jumped from to avoid terrestrial...

Novel AI algorithm for digital pathology analysis

Digital pathology is an emerging field which deals with mainly microscopy images that are derived from patient biopsies. Because of the high resolution, most of these whole slide images (WSI) have a large size, typically exceeding a gigabyte (Gb). Therefore, typical image analysis methods cannot efficiently handle them. Seeing a need, researchers developed a novel artificial intelligence (AI)...

Noisy jackdaw birds reach 'consensus' before taking off

On cold, dark winter mornings, small black crows known as jackdaws can be heard calling loudly to one another from their winter roosting spots in the U.K. before taking off simultaneously right around sunrise. Now, researchers who've studied their daily activities in unprecedented detail report evidence that these groups of hundreds of individuals rely on a 'democratic' decision-making process to...