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139,747 articles from ScienceDaily

Mathematical model predicting disease spread patterns

A team of environmental engineers, alerted by the unusual wealth of data published regularly by county health agencies throughout the pandemic, began researching new methods to describe what was happening on the ground in a way that does not require obtaining information on individuals' movements or contacts. A new model predicts where a disease will spread from an outbreak, in what patterns and...

Why do some neurons degenerate and die in Alzheimer's disease, but not others?

Researchers have uncovered molecular clues that help explain what makes some neurons more susceptible than others in Alzheimer's disease. The scientists present evidence that neurons with high levels of the protein apolipoprotein E (apoE) are more sensitive to degeneration, and that this susceptibility is linked to apoE's regulation of immune-response molecules within neurons.

Feeling younger buffers older adults from stress, protects against health decline

People who feel younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study suggests one potential reason for the link between subjective age and health: Feeling younger could help buffer middle-aged and older adults against the damaging effects of stress.

Transforming atmospheric carbon into industrially useful materials

Plants are unparalleled in their ability to capture carbon from the air, but this benefit is temporary. Researchers have proposed a more permanent, and even useful, fate for this captured carbon by turning plants into a valuable industrial material called silicon carbide (SiC). A new study from scientists quantifies this process with more detail than ever before.

Surprising sand fly find yields new species of bacteria

Researchers made a surprising finding while examining areas where sand flies rear their young: a new species of bacteria that is highly attractive to pregnant sand flies. The findings could advance the production of ecologically safe baits or traps to reduce sand fly populations.

Researchers develop new metal-free, recyclable polypeptide battery that degrades on demand

The introduction of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries has revolutionized technology as a whole, leading to major advances in consumer goods across nearly all sectors. Battery-powered devices have become ubiquitous across the world. While the availability of technology is generally a good thing, the rapid growth has led directly to several key ethical and environmental issues surrounding the use of...

Evading the uncertainty principle in quantum physics

In quantum mechanics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that the position and speed of an object cannot both be known fully precisely at the same time. Researchers now show that two vibrating drumheads, the size of a human hair, can be prepared in a quantum state which evades the uncertainty principle.

Most human origins stories are not compatible with known fossils

In the 150 years since Charles Darwin speculated that humans originated in Africa, the number of species in the human family tree has exploded, but so has the level of dispute concerning early human evolution. A new review looks at the major discoveries in hominin origins since Darwin's works and argues that fossil apes can inform us about essential aspects of ape and human evolution, including...

Towards 2D memory technology by magnetic graphene

In spintronics, the magnetic moment of electrons is used to transfer and manipulate information. An ultra-compact 2D spin-logic circuitry could be built from 2D materials that can transport the spin information over long distances and provide strong spin-polarization of charge current. Experiments by physicists suggest that magnetic graphene can be the ultimate choice for these 2D spin-logic...

Homing in on the smallest possible laser

Physicists have succeeded in generating an unusual quantum state in charge carrier complexes that are closely linked to light particles and located in ultrathin semiconductor sheets. This process produces light similar to that of a laser. The phenomenon could be used to create the smallest possible solid-state lasers.

Hydrogen instead of electrification? Potentials and risks for climate targets

Hydrogen-based fuels should primarily be used in sectors such as aviation or industrial processes that cannot be electrified, finds a team of researchers. Producing these fuels is too inefficient, costly and their availability too uncertain, to broadly replace fossil fuels for instance in cars or heating houses. For most sectors, directly using electricity for instance in battery electric cars or...

Quantum drum duet measured

Like conductors of a spooky symphony, researchers have 'entangled' two small mechanical drums and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Entangled pairs like this might someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks.